Are you getting tired of tease teasing?

"Halloween 6" star Paul Rudd in the trailer for the trailer for "Ant-Man."
“Halloween 6” star Paul Rudd in the trailer for the trailer for “Ant-Man.”

I’m an admitted trailer junkie. Back in the days when I used to watch E! I was all about that show Coming Attractions with future Vegas Price is Right Live! host Todd Newton. When we had dial-up I used to wait at my computer for hours while downloading trailers and then I freaked out when the phone rang and stopped me from seeing 2 minutes of The Big Hit.

These days I’ll sit in front of my laptop for an hour watching the “red carpet premiere” for the Furious 7 trailer, knowing the whole time that I can do the laundry or practice juggling or run a couple miles and come back in 60 minutes to watch the thing.

I’m just kidding, I don’t run.

If you’ve ever watched Entertainment Tonight you know how they tease their viewers. You get a 30-second clip promoting some story about some reality TV person at the beginning of the show, then you get the same clip every five minutes until you finally get to the end of the show and the actual story is about 10 seconds long and told you something you already read on Twitter three days ago.

That’s what I started thinking about when Marvel’s “human-sized” Ant-Man tease showed up on YouTube today. It was a version of the 17-second clip that you could actually see, as opposed to the miniaturized (and from a marketing standpoint, very clever) clip that went online a day ago.

I wondered, “Have we gotten to the point where ‘teasing the tease’ is the norm?” In Marvel’s case, it’s actually teasing the tease of a tease with a miniaturized tease.

Marvel is promising the full trailer (if it doesn’t leak first) during Tuesday’s premiere of its Agent Carter series. And you know it won’t come during the first act. In all likelihood you’ll have to wait until the second hour and then Ryan Seacrest will have to read the results of something and there will be five more commercial breaks and then the trailer will be over before you know it.

When I posted the new Ant-Man clip to the Now Playing Podcast Facebook page it sparked a discussion on this topic, with a lot of fans annoyed by the new strategy.

Tonight I added this Hollywood Reporter piece to the thread. I think it sheds some light on the “why” question. The most-watched trailer of the year was the Fifty Shades of Grey trailer, with 93 million views.

So there’s your answer. It’s not just about getting people to watch Agent Carter.

I’m curious to hear anyone’s thoughts on the “teasing a tease” strategy. My guess is it won’t hurt Ant-Man’s box office.

Batman-Superman moves in on ‘Marvel May’

tu-batman-supermanSummer 2015 just got a little less crowded.

Summer 2016 just got a whole lot more interesting.

Word came late Friday that Warner Bros. was pushing its biggest 2015 film, the still-untitled Batman-Superman team-up, back almost a full year.

The film will now hit theaters May 6, 2016.

While fans might protest the delay, there are two reasons Warner Bros. executives have reason to smile tonight.

First, they’ve saved their heroes from suffocating in one of the most crowded summer schedules in recent years.

Batman and Superman faced a three-pronged assault from Marvel Comics, which is headlining the summer with three films: Edgar Wright’s Ant-Man, a rebooted Fantastic Four and the biggest of them all, Avengers: Age of Ultron.

If that wasn’t enough, new entries in the Fast & Furious, Terminator, Jurassic Park, Mad Max and Bourne franchises also threatened to steal some of the spotlight (and box office) from the DC heroes.

Warner is hoping to use Batman-Superman as a launch pad for a long-awaited Justice League film that could include Wonder Woman, The Flash and Green Lantern.

Why steer that potential franchise into the frenzy and risk Batman-Superman becoming the “other superhero film” of the summer?

Friday’s announcement signals a strategy shift for Warner — a declaration that it will no longer be the runner-up in the annual summer of superheroes.

Marvel owns the month of May. Even before Iron Man kicked off the Marvel Cinematic Universe in 2008, the X-Men and Spider-Man were kicking off the summer movie season in May, and breaking box office records with sequel after sequel.

Now, the DC heroes are moving in on “Marvel May” and planting a flag of their own.

If its rivals yield rather than defend their territory, Batman-Superman could have a clear field of two, possibly three weekends as the biggest heroes on the block.

Come to think of it, that’s a lot of time to win over new fans and lay the groundwork for future films.

Warner appears to be following the Avengers blueprint; perhaps they’re already maneuvering a second superhero tentpole to follow that same summer?

It worked for Marvel.